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A Victory Dance for LGBT Rights

Posted on:
May 20, 2014
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Activism, LGBTQ, Video
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A rabbi who publicized a dance instructor’s sexual orientation, thereby damaging her livelihood, will have to pay her 60,000 shekels ($17,400) as compensation, as well as apologizing to her.

The Jerusalem District Court reversed an earlier decision by a magistrate’s court, which had ruled the rabbi had acted in good faith when he called on women in his neighborhood to refrain from going to a popular dance group since the instructor was gay.

In its decision, the judge also removed a ban on publicizing the names of the persons involved. Nurit Melamed is a choreographer and folk dancing instructor who held classes in several Jerusalem neighborhoods, including one in Givat Mordechai, home to an Orthodox population.

Rabbi Isser Klonsky, the former rabbi of the neighborhood, spread a warning about her classes, forbidding women from attending since the classes were “an abomination.”

In a lawsuit Melamed claimed that, following this letter, her rental agreement with the hall in which the classes were held was revoked and the class terminated. Classes in other neighborhoods also dwindled and she became depressed.

However, the magistrate’s court accepted the rabbi’s claims that her sexual orientation was known and that he had acted innocently, concerned about her romantic ties, including with a married woman who had left her husband. He saw this as a “threat” against his community.

One of the witnesses who backed the rabbi was Rabbi Yuval Cherlow, one of the founders of Tzohar, an organization of modern orthodox rabbis, who was known in recent years to be holding dialogues with the gay community.

Melamed appealed to the District Court, represented by attorney Riki Shapira Rosenberg from the Israel Religious Action Center, the legal arm of the Reform movement in Israel, and by attorney Ziva Ofek.

The district court overturned the decision, and the two sides reached a compromise under which Klonsky would apologize and pay Melamed 60,000 shekels.

:: Haaretz.com

Israeli-Canadian singer’s new single seeks to give Purim miracle everyday relevance

Posted on:
March 16, 2014
Category:
Arts, Blog, Music, Religion
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In time for Purim 2014, popular Israeli-Canadian singer and composer Naftali Kalfa seeks to give everyday relevance to the Jewish holiday’s age-old story with his recently released single “Miracles.”

Written by Kalfa, and recorded alongside well-known Israeli singer Gad Elbaz and Jewish reggae singer-songwriter Ari Lesser, a native of Cleveland, Ohio, “Miracles” is a song thanking God for saving the Jewish people living in ancient Persia who were slated for annihilation at the hands of the King Ahasuerus’s second in command, Haman the Agagite.

The story of the miraculous salvation of Persian Jewry is recorded in the biblical book of Esther and is customarily read by Jews all over the world on Purim in commemoration of those events.

In an interview with JNS.org, Kalfa explains that the song—which includes sections in both Hebrew and English—not only focuses on Purim and other miracles throughout Jewish history that are detailed in the Bible, but also seeks to “inspire us to think about the small miracles that happen in this world every single day.”

“How many people wake up in the morning and mean it when they recite the ‘Modeh Ani’ prayer, thanking God for returning our souls back to us?” Kalfa asks.

The lyrics of Kalfa’s song express his strong sentiment that Jews shouldn’t take “small miracles” for granted, whether it’s waking up in the morning, having a properly functioning body, or being able to earn a livelihood. He says that these everyday activities and others all warrant an expression of thanks to God.

The new single comes on the heels of the release of Kalfa’s latest album, a double CD titled “The Naftali Kalfa Project,” featuring 28 original compositions and orchestrated songs alongside some of most established and well-known names in the world of Jewish music today.

Musical collaborations feature artists including Shlomo Katz, Yossi Piamenta, Yehuda Glantz, Gad Elbaz, Yosef Chaim Shwekey, Lenny Solomon, Benny Elbaz, Yehuda Solomon, Shyne, and many others.

“These songs are part of me, like my children—and many of them were inspired by my children” says Kalfa, a native of Toronto who splits his time between Canada and Israel and is a father of five.

With styles spanning numerous genres, from cantorial music to rock, Kalfa drew inspiration for the music on his new album from the Book Psalms and prayers, with songs like “This Time Next Year,” taken from the Passover Haggadah, and the Yom Kippur-derived “Adon Haselichot” (“Master of Forgiveness”). But he also focused on the strong Jewish spirit to persevere, with songs like “Refaenu” (“Heal Us”), “Ten Li Koach” (“Give Me Strength”), “Bridges,” and “I Will Be.”

“The uniqueness of this album is that it welcomes the talents of a diverse collection of artists while being inspired by an underlying love for music and connection to Hashem that is at the heart of everything we do as singers and composers,” Kalfa says. “It’s been a real honor to bring together so many people for this project, and I’m confident that listeners will feel that sense of passion within each and every song.”

Kalfa, 33, whose debut album titled “Yihyu Liratzon” was recorded in collaboration with the Piamenta brothers, says that his passion for music started as a young child.

“I was always the guy in the synagogue standing next to the chazan (cantor), or at weddings trying to understand what the band was doing,” he says.

Kalfa says he has had a wide array of influences on his career, from Elvis Presley, Eric Clapton, and The Rolling Stones to some of the most well-known names in the world of Jewish music, such as Avraham Fried and Mordechai Ben David. His first recorded composition was a cover of the popular Simon and Garfunkel classic “The Sound of Silence,” titled V’ani Tefilati (“I Am My Prayer”), which he says came to him on a road trip with friends in the U.S.

The singer adds that at least half of the songs on the new album “were composed during Friday afternoon pre-Shabbat ‘jam-sessions,’” which he attends regularly with a group of musically talented friends in his community of Ma’ale Adumim.

While Kalfa does some live-performance touring, appearing at concerts and other events in Israel and abroad, he says that he performs live “as little as possible,” preferring to spontaneously compose. But he admits that some of the most fulfilling moments in his career have included playing live—whether in front of Israel Defense Forces soldiers at the Gaza border [during 2012’s Operation Pillar of Defense], “trying to give them the joy of music, as they waited to go into battle,” at a high school for troubled teenage girls, or at an old-age home in front of his grandmother and the other residents.

“Visiting my grandmother, while singing and bringing in the guitar to the old-age home, to me, that means more than playing in front of 5,000 fans, or even in Madison Square Garden,” he says. Referring to his visit with the soldiers during Pillar of Defense, Kalfa says, “That experience really touched my neshama (soul).”

Kalfa admits that the world of Jewish music is a difficult business and that “only the guys at the very top are the ones able to make a good living.” To compensate, he is involved in other business ventures. Yet he hopes that one day, he can dedicate all of his time to his music, and says that it’s really not about the money.

“All the music I make is for my neshama and comes from the neshama,” Kalfa says.

“I’m just an imperfect Jew who aspires to improve and to work towards being the best person I can be,” he says. “I hope that my music can inspire.”

::JNS

Jewish-Arab collaborations – Na’gham el Hood

Posted on:
March 12, 2014
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This weeks episode is all about co- existence. The artists on the playlist are mainly Palestinian and Israeli bands, some working in collaboration with each other, others singing about the change they wish to see in the world. At the end of the day, music builds bridges between nationalities, language and cultures, and helps connect us. These artists show that a collaboration between Arabs and Israelis is possible and can make amazing music, so imagine what summits we can reach when peace finally comes!

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Fantasy date in TLV? Is the next Bachelorette Jewish?

Posted on:
March 11, 2014
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Rumours are swirling that ABC’s next Bachelorette, Andi Dorfman, is Jewish.

While we can’t confirm whether or not this is true, it sure is nice to dream!

Each week, the Bachelor franchise sees contestants travel to swanky hot spots around the world in hopes of finding love. We don’t know about you, but here at SDM, we are really hoping for a Tel Aviv date next season!

The Bachelorette will air on ABC beginning May 19, 2014.

 

2013 RECAP: SDM’s 15 favourite coexistence stories of 2013

Posted on:
December 31, 2013
Category:
Coexistence
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Beyond the stories that “sell” are the untold stories that bring people together. As 2013 ends, these are the stories we would like to focus on, and hope that 2014 will be full of Hope, Peace and Coexistence. 

15. VIDEO: Israeli hockey team in Winnipeg via ‘The National’

Coexistence

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14. Small screen unites Israelis, Palestinians

Coexsitence

Click here to read article

13. A.C.T. for PEACE: SDM’s ONE-on-ONE with Niro, Khaled and Darling of the One Passion Project

Coexistence

Click here to read story

12. Israeli and Afghan educators meet

Coexistence

Click here to read story

11. Sudanese, Lebanese students enroll in Open University

Open University

Click here to read story

10. VIDEO: IDF soldiers caught on film dancing at Palestinian wedding

Soldier

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9. Youth return from Palestinian-Israeli summer camp with new perspective

Coexistence

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8. Peace prize for Jewish and Muslim leaders of United Hatzalah

http://www.sizedoesntmatter.com/coexistence/peace-prize-for-jewish-and-muslim-leaders-of-united-hatzalah/

Click here to read article

7. Israeli And Palestinian Metal Bands Join Forces For European Tour

Coexistence

Click here to read article

6. Israeli art in heart of Tehran

Iran Israel

Click here to read article

5. VIDEO: Israeli, Palestinian businessmen unite

Coexistence

Click here to read article

4. New film seeks to show that love conquers all, even the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Coexistence

Click here to read article

3. A.C.T. for Peace: Co-existence on the set of Master Chef – Israel

Coexistence

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2. Rita: No quarrel between Iranians, Israelis

Rita

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1. Israel, Jordan, PA sign historic Red Sea-Dead Sea canal deal

Israel

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VIDEO: Bilingual Jerusalem School, where Hebrew and Arabic go Hand in Hand

Posted on:
December 11, 2013
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Arab Jewish School

Principal Nadia Kanana and a young teacher take viewers on a tour, in Arabic, of a special school. Hand in Hand in Jerusalem is a bilingual school for Jewish and Arab students. The staff in each of the four schools in the network is equally balanced between Arab and Jewish principals and teachers.

Every class is co-taught by teachers from both groups, and respect is the guiding principle. Lessons are in Hebrew and Arabic, and the co-teachers can divide the lesson subject or teach it together. The children, who follow Hand in Hand’s motto: “learning together, living together,” may look up to the adults for inspiration, but they also have learned to find their own way towards getting along and even beyond, to friendship.