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Category Archive » Innovation

The Man Behind Grindr

Posted on:
June 26, 2014
Category:
Blog, Innovation, LGBTQ
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When describing Grindr, individuals would characterize it as the gay version of Tinder.

Don’t know what Tinder is? Not to worry. Tinder is the modern- age dating app that connects with singles in and around an individual’s area. All you have to do is enter your information, dating preferences, and boom, you have yourself  a pool of men or women (which ever you prefer) to choose from!

Joel SImkhai

Grindr is similar to Tinder in its process, however, is geared specifically towards gay men. The man behind this successful app is Joel Simkhai. Born and raised in Tel Aviv, Joel created the app on the thought that he was answering a certain need. Many individuals view Grindr as a sexual app that exploits gay men and encourages anonymous sex. Although Joel asks individuals not to view the app as a sex driven machine, its hard to deny that individuals are using it as so. According to Haaretz, Grindr is like the “McDonaldization of hook-ups”: addicting, satisfying, but probably not the best for you.

That doesn’t stop anybody! With over a million downloads and a lot of media attention, Joel Simkhai’s app is a huge success, and not to mention, a gay man’s dream.

 

 

 

A Transit Revolution

Posted on:
June 24, 2014
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If you are anything like me, sweaty and claustrophobic public transit might not be your preferred way of getting around, but what if I told you that there was an easier, faster, and cleaner way of transportation?

Recently, tech company SkyTran has made plans to build a network of hover cars in Tel Aviv. You heard right! All it takes is a click of a button on your smartphone, and you have got yourself a hover car.

 

SkyTran

Click image above to watch 

SkyTran is a tech company based in California that is working towards revolutionizing transit. The company is said to begin their plans for hover cars in countries, like: Israel, India, and the United States. Joe Dignan, an independent smart city expert, said the system resembles “a hybrid between existing infrastructure and autonomous vehicles”. He then continues on in saying: “It will get the market in the mood for autonomous vehicles – it is not too scary, is cheaper than building out a train line and uses part of the urban landscape, 20 feet above ground, that isn’t currently used.”

Fast, efficient, clean, and spatial. If this is what the future is like, I am totally okay with that.

 

Yo, it’s that simple

Posted on:
June 23, 2014
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YoApp

Whether you’re messaging a friend good morning, parents for money, love interest to come over, or significant other I love you… say it with Yo.

So what exactly is this urban dictionary- coined term? Who knows, and who cares! All that really matters is that the yo movement has changed the face of technology, more like it is the face of technology. Recently, Israeli developers have created an app that requires zero navigation, and is one click away from getting that hot girl next door or cool guy in your friend group to notice you. Those witty developers like to call this app Yo.

Currently, Yo is the number one iPhone app in Israel and is on the rise elsewhere (in fact the app has had up to $1 million in investment, so far).

Some Israelis can now proudly say they lost their English speaking virginity to the word yo. Mazel tov!

However, not everyone is enthusiastic about this yo movement. Besides the app’s simpleminded façade, individuals have claimed that it can also be a breach of privacy, since others have been known to uncover people’s usernames and phone numbers (Yo, stranger).

So what can we take away from this app? Endless possibilities. For instance, a cool pick-up line that says “I am not trying too hard,” gents!

Read more about all the hype around Yo on Bloomberg.com.

Telicon Alley

Posted on:
June 19, 2014
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Tel Aviv is a close second to Silicon Valley, according to Google’s Eric Schmidt

It walks like it, talks like it (with a slight accent), and is probably at the same level of intelligence as it.

According to Google’s Eric Schmidt, Tel Aviv is a close second to Silicon Valley, where no other city in the world compares.

In his talks, Schmidt highlights the vast amount of talent seeded in Tel Aviv, and recommends entrepreneurs to exploit it: “You should exploit the talent here and if necessary, hire an American manager to run the U.S. branch,” Schmidt said. “The Israeli CEO should stay close to the development center, because that is the most important thing.”

Read more at Algemeiner.

Uber drives its way into Israel

Posted on:
June 19, 2014
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Uber

The exclusive driver service, Uber, is officially coming to Tel Aviv to challenge Israeli taxi app, Get Taxi.

Both companies provide customers with a car service at a single click of a button.

The apps were built for smartphones to provide easy, private, and fast transportation. American company, Uber, has expanded all over the world in cities like: New York, Moscow, St. Petersburg, London, and now Tel Aviv. But before they hit the streets, the company is looking for a Tel Aviv based manager. Do you have potential?

Read more at No Camel.

Tobacco as a health benefit, not scare?

Posted on:
June 18, 2014
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vergenix

Israeli bio tech firm Collplant is scheduled to test its tobacco based collagen, in which successfully repairs injured parts of the human body.

Collagen is a key protein in the human body that allows for it to repair itself.

Most medical products include collagen, however, is most of the time artificial. Artificial collagen has its setbacks, by which, it does not completely heel the wounded area.

Collplant researchers work towards finding a solution that ultimately clones human collagen in that it repairs the body successfully.

The firm is set to begin tests at the Maccabi Health Clinics in Israel, where hopefully this plant based solution will advance medical treatments.

 

Read more at Times of Israel.